Tag Archives: Conservatives

Your mandate is tiny. Stop telling people to be quiet

Jun 23, 2016 will go down as a historic and victorious day for a marginal political party who never stopped banging their anti EU drum. UKIP not only scored their ultimate victory on that date but managed something of a secondary victory by bringing about the opportunity to turn the Labour and Conservative parties into deeply divided political entities, both more intent on infighting and political ambition than running the country. 

This isn’t a cheerleaders post for Nigel Farage or anyone else in UKIP this is merely a representation of events as I see them.  Britain joined the European Economic Community on 1 January 1973, along with Denmark and Ireland. Ever since that date there have been those amongst the electorate and political class alike who have been described as ‘eurosceptic’. There are a whole host of reasons as to why people didn’t agree with Britain’s membership with the EEC and ultimately the European Union. I won’t go into those now as people must be bored of justifying which way they voted on both sides of the debate. In 1993 the United Kingdom Independence Party was born and it was born out of decades of frustration regarding Britain’s membership of the EU.

nige
UKIP leader Nigel Farage

The beauty of living in a democratic society is that if you don’t like the way something is happening politically you are afforded (at times) the opportunity to change it. UKIP helped tear an already divided Tory Party apart over EU membership, with some MP’s defecting to the party. UKIP has taken a huge number of working class votes away from the Labour Party too, in fact 6 million in last years General Election represents a big loss of votes to both of the UK’s biggest parties.

In the aftermath of Brexit there have been a flurry of articles, Facebook status’ and broadcast appearances telling those who voted remain to ‘suck it up’ and get on with it. Here’s why that won’t happen: If eurosceptics had just ‘got on with it’ post 1973 UKIP would never have been born and the EU referendum might never have come about. It is only by ‘whinging’ and voting and campaigning and becoming activists that anything of political significance ever comes about.

Long after Theresa May or Michael ‘Brutus’ Gove are made the countries next PM, long after the Labour Party coup of Jeremy Corbyn fails or succeeds, long after Britain has gone through economic uncertainty, long after Article 50 is invoked will people be rallying for rejoining the EU. It may take years or decades and is most likely not to happen in my lifetime but rest assured if enough people are passionate about EU membership or something like it, the next generation may be asked to vote on where they see their future.

In the mean time it might be an idea for the young to stop attacking the old and vice versa despite whatever valid points each may have. Scapegoating the working class rather than listening to their worries and concerns is deeply unhelpful too. Which ever of the two main political parties realises this the quickest and stops their respective civil wars has the best chance of giving the county some much needed leadership at a time of real fear and concern, especially for minorities. There is an opportunity here to fix the mess made by two Etonians who have been in competition with each other since the day they clapped eyes on one another. They aren’t going to pick up the pieces and if Labour and the Tories aren’t quick to fix the current national divide, a rejuvenated UKIP might just cease the opportunity to inflict more damage. That for many is a huge concern.

Advertisements

UK politics is leaving the electorate nowhere to go

Over the last six years there has been plenty of talk about the ‘mess Labour left’ and the famed Conservative ‘Long term economic plan’.

In May of last year 24.3% of the population registered to vote gave the Conservatives a small majority government. There are several issues with our current voting system (first past the post) none more infuriating for those who vote than the lack of proper representation. UKIP and the Green Party for instance missed out enormously because of the current system and whether you like either’s policies, a huge number of people in Britain voted for them.

The Conservatives whilst in government have reiterated a few messages key to getting the public on board with their plans. Most notably they have spoken time and again about the huge deficit left to them by the Labour government before them.

That Labour government borrowed staggering amounts of money. So did every other nation in the world capable of doing so. When the banks went bust the taxpayer footed the bill. Whilst Labour aren’t blameless for this situation they are no more culpable than Conservatives.

The reason the Conservatives have to take their shame of the blame of the global financial crisis is because their spiritual leader, the late Margaret Thatcher, deregulated the banks in such a huge way that small banks were swallowed up and eventually the country was left with a group of super (investment) banks. Whilst Thatcher was doing this in Britain Reagan was doing the same in America. Their banks pretty much owned ours, so when their empire fell ours did too.

Whilst establishing a service industry in the country she systematically took apart Britain’s manufacturing industry and for short term gains privatised several public services. These include telecommunications, the rail network and the banking system.

There has been a great deal of focus on production in the country over the last few days and in order to stimulate growth the Chancellor has come up with the idea of cutting corporation tax. Fine in principle, flawed when it comes at the cost of the disabled and vulnerable.

For anyone thinking this is a love letter to the Labour party here is an assessment of where they have left us up to this point. They failed to reverse any of damage Thatcher’s policy inflicted on the manufacturing industry leaving the country reliant on the city of London to stimulate the economy. It’s pretty clear that when banks are given freedom to behave as they please, it doesn’t work out for the average tax payer.

They also spent a disgusting amount of money on an illegal war *cough* Hutton report *cough* at the cost to lives to those in Britain’s armed forces but more importantly huge numbers of civilians in the region. The Middle East is now as unstable as it has ever been and that is largely due to the handy work of Tony Blair and his cronies within New Labour. It is no exaggeration to say that the last Labour government left the world in a bloody and violent mess. This is almost certainly due to leaving a vacuum of power across the Middle East (Iraq, Libya, Syria) that has been swallowed up by terrorists.

Back to today and we have a Chancellor too scared to appear in the House of Commons because he has no answers to the question what on earth has happened to your budget? During his time as Chancellor George Osborne has imposed several targets aimed at impressing the electorate and failed almost every one.

The scary thing is Iain Duncan Smith stated in his resignation letter he couldn’t stand by these proposed cuts to PIP which would have seen the disabled of this country over four billion pounds worse off. This the man who was happy to endorse policy such as the bedroom tax which has been linked to the rise of suicide. Worse still given what has been said in parliament today we will have no clue as to where this black hole in funding will be filled until the autumn statement.

The SNP (and much of Scotland) have had enough and think their chances are better off going it alone. Financially it would be tough but given what’s currently on offer in British politics who can blame them? The Labour party is engulfed in tribal infighting surrounding their future direction. The Conservatives are tearing themselves apart over Europe and ‘compassionate Conservatism’ whilst the Liberal Democrats barely even exist.

When politics fails as miserably as is happening in Britain today there is always a groundswell of support for smaller parties. If history has taught us anything, this unfortunately leads to a surge in sympathy for the far right.

Labour and the Tories need to get their act together for sake of the electorate. Unfortunately too many in government forget that’s how and why they are there in the first place.